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Self-esteem is how you think and feel about yourself; this may be positive, negative or move between the two points. This usually dictates how you live your life and the decisions you make – and how you view others too. 
 
The more positive feelings you have about yourself, the higher your self-esteem is; the more negative feelings you have the lower your self-esteem is. Our materialist world, where people continually compare themselves with those around them, highlights our insecurities and often leads us to feel negative about ourselves and the way we live. We lose sight of the value of our own individuality and then feel inadequate and unsatisfied. It can become an enduring personality trait. 
 
Working to improve your self-esteem takes time and effort. It requires courage and honesty to confront the things in yourself you don’t like but long-term it is a worthwhile task which should help you to feel better about yourself and your life. 
 
Our esteem develops from our experiences and relationships from birth. Negative experiences and troubled relationships lower it, and good experiences and strong bonds raise it. No single event or person determines your level of self-esteem, it develops over time and can change with time and events. 

Common Symptoms 

Feeling worthless 
Feeling incompetent 
Feeling unloved 
Being overwhelmed 
Being unrealistic about goals 
Fear of change 
Distorted views of self and others. 

Types of esteem issues 

 
Individuals here have a generally negative outlook on life and of their chances for success and failure. Its not, however, debilitating to live with. People here want the same things people with high self esteem want but are too afraid or concerned with preserving their mental state than risking pain by trying something. They use such tactics as holding lower expectations, limiting themselves, judging things harshly, and avoiding risk. It’s not a clinical condition but it does cause people to miss out on many opportunities in life. 
 
Associated with some 24 clinical conditions. Depression is the most commonly associated one with low self-esteem, but also anxiety disorders, eating disorders, attention deficit disorder etc. 
 
An individual here bases their self-esteem largely on the acceptance or approval of others. They strive constantly to meet a parents or partners idea of perfection or try to live up to social or religious ideals even though they may not necessarily be aligned with their own. They strive to maintain a high social status at all costs and seek love and attention through dependency, subservience, or sexuality. This doesn’t mean that an individual is not competent or has no skills. It just means they don’t have the competency in the areas that matter to them in terms of being approved or feeling accepted. This is the non-clinical portion of the sector. These people seek approval of others to make themselves feel good. Their lack of competence causes them to be sensitive to criticism, under achieve in the workplace, rationalize their performance by avoiding confrontation, making excuses, blaming others, seeking positive feedback constantly etc. If they deeply believe in their sense of self-importance they deny their shortcomings and are seen as snobbish, stuck up and conceited. 
 
The more that importance is placed on achievement, the more fragile self-esteem becomes. Our western society highly rewards success, so it is very seductive because it feels good when we are acknowledged. Self-esteem often fluctuates with successes and failures. An example is high achieving college students who suddenly find themselves unable to get into a graduate program. Individuals with this type of self-esteem are highly motivated, work hard, and sometimes become really accomplished in some areas. As long as they continue to achieve they look good to people in general and score high on tests of self-esteem. However, it can change dramatically – having their abilities questioned, work criticized, or failure promotes highly defensive reactions, ranging from mild put downs and snide comments of attackers, to outright aggression. Perfectionism also falls into this category, as anything less than perfect is a failure, which can cause a high degree of self-criticism. Towards the clinical end perfectionism becomes more severe. Coupled with the lack of feeling worthy comes added pressures such as high self-expectations, having critical parents, being young, being female in a society obsessed with weight, being skinny, dieting, anorexia, and compulsive behaviours all start to become high clinical risks 
At the extreme end of the high-competence/low-worthiness scale, success then become tied to one’s sense of value or worth. Examples are business men and women who destroy others to advance their career; competitors who succeed at any cost; politicians making under-handed deals to get their way. Individuals doing this are said to be acting in an “anti-social” way, conflicting with societies rules. Individuals who deliberately, consciously, and consistently violate the rights of others to get what they want do not seem to be particularly interested in being “worthy”. In its most extreme form, anti-social competence based self-esteem shows the brutality and ruthlessness depicted by various dictators around the world 

Discovery Session 

During our Discovery Session we will discuss your symptoms and how long you have been suffering from them also any medication that you are on. We will also explore any ‘triggers’ that may bring on an episode to understand a little more. 
 
 
The session will also help me: 
 
Understand how your symptoms impact your daily life. 
Explain how the brain works and its influence on how you feel today. 
Explain how Hypnotherapy can assist in creating positive change. 
Set you on the road to recovery 
 
I do not undertake any hypnotherapy in the first session but you will leave with access to an MP3 which you can use to relieve stress and build confidence. 
 
This is for you to keep even if you do not persue further treatment with Genesis Therapy. 

The Treatment (Clinical Session) 

Solution focused hypnotherapy (SFH) is all about you and your goals. It encourages you to discover and use your inner resources based on a practical strategy that inspires change in a very short period of time. From the first session you will start to take back control. 
 
We will: 
 
Set actionable goals. 
Use Hypnosis for relaxation and guided visualisation. 
Use questioning techniques. 
Set Homework – MP3 and other exercises. 
Measure your progress. 
 
While the approach of SFH is client focused and encourages you to discover your own inner strength and resources, it’s important to note that you are not alone in this. You and I will work together as a team to move forward from what’s troubling you. 
 
Your body is programmed to respond to any threats you perceive by releasing different hormones. This anxiety response is intended to keep you safe by increasing your levels or awareness and producing fight, flight or freeze reactions. 
 
However, if anxiety lasts for too long you might find yourself feeling frightened or worried, even when there isn’t a threat. 
 
With the help of neuroscience we are starting to understand more about anxiety. We know that parts of your brain (the amygdala, hippocampus and hypothalamus) have roles to play. They interpret signals from your surroundings and store memories of past events. 
 
Solution focused hypnotherapy (SFH) will help you to take back control of your responses. Relaxation and visualisation can help with physical symptoms such as a fast heartbeat, rapid breathing and muscle tension. Changes to patterns of thought, such as dwelling on problems or risks, can also reduce fears and worries. 

Common Symptoms 

Feeling constantly tense, worried, or on edge? 
Interferes with your abilities at work or school? 
Plagued by irrational fears that you know are irrational? 
Difficulty concentrating and irritable? 
Avoid everyday situations / activities due to anxiety? 
Experience attacks of heart-pounding panic? 
Feel like there’s danger around every corner? 

Types of anxiety disorder 

 
People with generalised anxiety disorder (GAD) feel extremely worried or feel nervous about these and other things—even when there is little or no reason to worry about them. People with GAD find it difficult to control their anxiety and stay focused on daily tasks. 
 
GAD develops slowly. It often starts during the teen years or young adulthood. People with GAD may: 
 
Worry very much about everyday things 
Have trouble controlling their worries or feelings of nervousness 
Know that they worry much more than they should 
Feel restless and have trouble relaxing 
Have a hard time concentrating 
Be easily startled 
Have trouble falling asleep or staying asleep 
Feel easily tired or tired all the time 
Have headaches, muscle aches, stomach aches, or unexplained pains 
Have a hard time swallowing 
Tremble or twitch 
Be irritable or feel “on edge” 
Sweat a lot, feel light-headed or out of breath 
Have to go to the bathroom a lot 
 
Children and teens with GAD often worry excessively about: 
 
Their performance, such as in school or in sports 
Catastrophes, such as earthquakes or war 
 
Adults with GAD are often highly nervous about everyday circumstances, such as: 
 
Job security or performance 
Health 
Finances 
The health and well-being of their children 
Being late 
Completing household chores and other responsibilities 
 
Panic disorder is a type of anxiety disorder. It causes panic attacks, which are sudden feelings of terror when there is no real danger. You may feel as if you are losing control. You may also have physical symptoms, such as 
 
Fast heartbeat 
Chest or stomach pain 
Breathing difficulty 
Weakness or dizziness 
Sweating 
Feeling hot or a cold chill 
Tingly or numb hands 
 
Panic attacks can happen anytime, anywhere, and without warning. You may live in fear of another attack and may avoid places where you have had an attack. For some people, fear takes over their lives and they cannot leave their homes. 
 
Panic disorder is more common in women than men. It usually starts when people are young adults. Sometimes it starts when a person is under a lot of stress. Most people get better with treatment. Therapy can show you how to recognize and change your thinking patterns before they lead to panic. 
 
Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a type of anxiety disorder. If you have OCD, you have frequent, upsetting thoughts called obsessions. To try to control the thoughts, you feel an overwhelming urge to repeat certain rituals or behaviors. These are called compulsions. 
 
Examples of obsessions are a fear of germs or a fear of being hurt. Compulsions include washing your hands, counting, checking on things, or cleaning. With OCD, the thoughts and rituals cause distress and get in the way of your daily life. 
 
Researchers think brain circuits may not work properly in people who have OCD. It tends to run in families. The symptoms often begin in children or teens. 
 
A phobia is a type of anxiety disorder. It is a strong, irrational fear of something that poses little or no real danger. 
 
There are many specific phobias. Acrophobia is a fear of heights. Agoraphobia is a fear of public places, and claustrophobia is a fear of closed-in places. If you become anxious and extremely self-conscious in everyday social situations, you could have a social phobia. Other common phobias involve tunnels, highway driving, water, flying, animals and blood. 
 
People with phobias try to avoid what they are afraid of. If they cannot, they may experience 
 
Panic and fear 
Rapid heartbeat 
Shortness of breath 
Trembling 
A strong desire to get away 
 
Phobias usually start in children or teens, and continue into adulthood. The causes of specific phobias are not known, but they sometimes run in families. 
 
Social anxiety disorder is a persistent and irrational fear of situations that may involve scrutiny or judgment by others, such as at parties and other social events. 
Causes 
 
People with social anxiety disorder fear and avoid situations in which they may be judged by others. It may begin in the teens and may have to do with overprotective parents or limited social opportunities. Men and women are affected equally with this disorder. 
 
People with social phobia are at high risk for alcohol or other drug use. This is because they may come to rely on these substances to relax in social situations. 
Symptoms 
 
People with social anxiety become very anxious and self-conscious in everyday social situations. They have an intense, persistent, and chronic fear of being watched and judged by others, and of doing things that will embarrass them. They can worry for days or weeks before a dreaded situation. This fear may become so severe that it interferes with work, school, and other ordinary activities, and can make it hard to make and keep friends. 
 
Some of the most common fears of people with this disorder include: 
 
Attending parties and other social occasions 
Eating, drinking, and writing in public 
Meeting new people 
Speaking in public 
Using public restrooms 
 
Physical symptoms that often occur include: 
 
Blushing 
Difficulty talking 
Nausea 
Profuse sweating 
Trembling 
 
Social anxiety disorder is different from shyness. Shy people are able to participate in social functions. Social anxiety disorder affects the ability to function in work and relationships. 
 
Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a real illness. You can get PTSD after living through or seeing a traumatic event, such as war, a hurricane, sexual assault, physical abuse, or a bad accident. PTSD makes you feel stressed and afraid after the danger is over. It affects your life and the people around you. 
 
PTSD can cause problems like 
 
Flashbacks, or feeling like the event is happening again 
Trouble sleeping or nightmares 
Feeling alone 
Angry outbursts 
Feeling worried, guilty, or sad 
 
PTSD starts at different times for different people. Signs of PTSD may start soon after a frightening event and then continue. Other people develop new or more severe signs months or even years later. PTSD can happen to anyone, even children. 
 
Separation anxiety is a regular part of development for children between the age of six months to three years. When symptoms continue into late childhood, your child may be diagnosed as having child separation anxiety disorder. 
 
If separation anxiety continues into adulthood, you’ll be diagnosed with adult separation anxiety disorder. Symptoms of anxiety disorder in children and adults are similar. For children, separation anxiety is often associated with extreme fear or anxiety about being away from parents or caregivers. That can make a child less willing to participate in events or social experiences, like spending the night at a friend’s house or going to summer sleepaway camp. For adults, the anxiety is around being away from children or spouses. Instead of school, work function or other responsibilities can become impaired. 
 
Symptoms 
 
It’s normal to be concerned about the well-being of loved ones. People with adult separation anxiety disorder experience high levels of anxiety, and sometimes even panic attacks, when loved ones are out of reach. 
 
People with this disorder may be socially withdrawn, or show extreme sadness or difficulty concentrating when away from loved ones. In parents, the disorder can lead to strict, over-involved parenting. In relationships, you may be more likely to be an overbearing partner. 
 
Other common symptoms include: 
 
unfounded fears that loved ones, or yourself, will be abducted or fatally injured 
extreme and persistent hesitancy or refusal to leave the proximity of loved ones 
difficulty sleeping away from a loved one for fear that something will happen to them 
depression or anxiety attacks related to any of the above topics 
 
You may also have physical aches and pains, headaches, and diarrhea associated with periods of anxiety. 

Discovery Session 

During our Discovery Session we will discuss your symptoms and how long you have been suffering from them also any medication that you are on. We will also explore any ‘triggers’ that may bring on an episode to understand a little more. 
 
 
The session will also help me: 
 
Understand how your symptoms impact your daily life. 
Explain how the brain works and its influence on how you feel today. 
Explain how Hypnotherapy can assist in creating positive change. 
Set you on the road to recovery 
 
I do not undertake any hypnotherapy in the first session but you will leave with access to an MP3 which you can use to relieve stress and build confidence. 
 
This is for you to keep even if you do not persue further treatment with Genesis Therapy. 

The Treatment (Clinical Session) 

Solution focused hypnotherapy (SFH) is all about you and your goals. It encourages you to discover and use your inner resources based on a practical strategy that inspires change in a very short period of time. From the first session you will start to take back control. 
 
We will: 
 
Set actionable goals. 
Use Hypnosis for relaxation and guided visualisation. 
Use questioning techniques. 
Set Homework – MP3 and other exercises. 
Measure your progress. 
 
While the approach of SFH is client focused and encourages you to discover your own inner strength and resources, it’s important to note that you are not alone in this. You and I will work together as a team to move forward from what’s troubling you. 
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